Indie News

‘Jay And Silent Bob Reboot’ Flirts With Heartfelt Maturity, But Can’t Resist The Dumb Dick Jokes [Review]

What are our children, if not reboots of ourselves? This is the type of question stoners may ponder deep into the night and probably the situation Kevin Smith found himself in while formulating the storyline for his new sequel/reboot/remake/satire/parody/pothead comedy, “Jay and Silent Bob Reboot.” And when the holds the attention on this central theme, Smith’s latest comedy actually rises above the director’s own sophomoric, ridiculous tendencies. Though not for long.

Continue reading ‘Jay And Silent Bob Reboot’ Flirts With Heartfelt Maturity, But Can’t Resist The Dumb Dick Jokes [Review] at The Playlist.
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Bong Joon Ho Couldn’t See ‘Apocalypse Now’ Until South Korea Lifted Ban, Credits Film as Inspiration

Bong Joon Ho Couldn’t See ‘Apocalypse Now’ Until South Korea Lifted Ban, Credits Film as Inspiration
Francis Ford Coppola’s ambitious and notoriously troubled anti-Vietnam masterpiece “Apocalypse Now,” released in 1979, no doubt remains a defining moment for both cinephiles and audiences. At the ongoing Lumière Festival in Lyon, France, South Korean director Bong Joon Ho — who currently has a masterpiece of his own on his hands with the now-in-theaters “Parasite” — gushed over the film while onstage to honor Coppola with the festival’s lifetime achievement award.

At the French film festival, which presents restorations and retrospectives of classic films, Bong was joined by a crew of top talent including actress Nathalie Baye and Coppola’s son Roman. Also participating in the tribute to Coppola were famed Cannes Film Festival director Thierry Frémaux and filmmaker Bertrand Tavernier. Bong said that he was unable to see “Apocalypse Now” until 1988, nearly a decade after the film’s release, because it was banned in his native country.

“You actually represent my highest goal,
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Paparazzi Drove Keira Knightley to a Mental Breakdown: ‘I Told Them I Was Going to Kill Somebody’

Paparazzi Drove Keira Knightley to a Mental Breakdown: ‘I Told Them I Was Going to Kill Somebody’
English actress Keira Knightley, Academy Award-nominated for “Pride & Prejudice” and “The Imitation Game,” understandably did not handle public attention well after the release of her 2003 breakout, Disney’s “Pirates of the Caribbean.” Or with the many hits that followed. According to a new interview with The Telegraph, Knightley said that at age 22 — with “Love, Actually,” “King Arthur,” and “Atonement” all under her belt — she suffered a “mental breakdown” in the wake of being shadowed by paparazzi.

“The value of photographs of any famous young women at the time went up if they were of a very negative nature,” she told Robbie Collin, in reference to the media circuses that burst around such headline-grabbing stars as Amy Winehouse and Britney Spears. “So if you weren’t already having a mental breakdown, they were trying to push you into doing things that kept your value as high as those who were.
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Disney Eyes Robert Zemeckis To Direct Their ‘Pinocchio’ Adaptation

Ever since Disney launched its plan to release live-action animated new versions of its childhood classics, the studio has effectively been able to print money. Even better for the studio are these films’ resilience against criticism. “Aladdin” may only have a 57% on RottenTomatoes, but it still managed to gross $1.05 billion worldwide. “The Lion King” earn an even worse score at 53%, but that movie grossed a whopping $1.64 billion across the globe.

Continue reading Disney Eyes Robert Zemeckis To Direct Their ‘Pinocchio’ Adaptation at The Playlist.
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Netflix Remains Committed To John Cho After “Freak” ‘Cowboy Bebop’ Accident

For years now, John Cho has been the figurehead for increased Asian-American representation in Hollywood. Handsome, talented, and all-too-aware of the opportunities afforded him (or not) as an actor, it feels like Cho has been deserving of a signature role in a big franchise even as far back as “Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle.” And when Netflix cast him as Spike Spiegel in their upcoming adaptation of “Cowboy Bebop,” he accomplished the impossible: he inspired fans to set aside years of frustration and skepticism with the property and give the show a chance.

Continue reading Netflix Remains Committed To John Cho After “Freak” ‘Cowboy Bebop’ Accident at The Playlist.
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Guillermo del Toro on ‘The Shape of Water’ as an Elegy to Lost Love: ‘I Wanted to Make a Love Song’

Guillermo del Toro on ‘The Shape of Water’ as an Elegy to Lost Love: ‘I Wanted to Make a Love Song’
Mere days after taking home both Best Picture and Best Director Academy Awards for his monster-movie romance “The Shape of Water” in 2018, Mexican auteur Guillermo del Toro announced that he had recently divorced his wife of three decades. As revealed in a new interview with Elijah Wood and Daniel Noah on their indie genre production company SpectreVision’s podcast “Visitations,” the film was, for del Toro, an elegy to lost love and the “transformation” that occurs during marriage, and its fallout.

“I wanted to make a song, a love song,” del Toro said of “The Shape of Water,” which he wrote and directed. “I wanted it to feel like a song that you listen to in the car with the top down on the Pch on the way to the beach, a really beautiful melody. I wanted to say what I think love is, which is very very simple, which
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Sam Raimi Will Direct His First Horror Film Since 2009’s ‘Drag Me To Hell’

Is it possible to miss somebody even though they never left? That’s the question I often ask myself about director Sam Raimi. While the filmmaker hasn’t directed a horror film since 2009’s “Drag Me To Hell,” he’s stayed busy on the backend, helping develop the popular “Ash vs. Evil Dead” television series and backing projects by notable horror filmmakers like Alexandre Aja (“Crawl“) and Fede Álvarez (“Don’t Breathe“).

Continue reading Sam Raimi Will Direct His First Horror Film Since 2009’s ‘Drag Me To Hell’ at The Playlist.
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David Oyelowo and Jane Lynch Bring Humor and Heft to ‘Inside the Actors Studio’

David Oyelowo and Jane Lynch Bring Humor and Heft to ‘Inside the Actors Studio’
James Lipton may have retired, but his spirit lives on in the new season of “Inside the Actors Stduio.” The brilliant concept — actors and directors discuss their work in front of a live audience of eager young acting students — has attracted countless talents from across genres, including Lauren Bacall, Meryl Streep, Robin Williams, Tom Hanks, and the entire main voice cast of “The Simpsons.”

For the first season sans-Lipton on its new home at Ovation (it previously aired on Bravo), the venerated series is changing up the format: Guests will now be interviewed by fellow actors or directors. The new season includes Laura Dern in conversation with Greta Gerwig; Al Pacino speaking to Ellen Burstyn; and Pedro Pascal interviewing Willem Dafoe. For this Sunday’s episode, “Inside the Actors Studio” has David Oyelowo sitting down with Jane Lynch.

A longtime fan of the series, Lynch jumped at the opportunity to host,
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Ethan Hawke Grows a Beard and Finds a Baby in a Dumpster in ‘Adopt a Highway’ Trailer

Ethan Hawke Grows a Beard and Finds a Baby in a Dumpster in ‘Adopt a Highway’ Trailer
Ethan Hawke stars as an ex-felon looking to right his wrongs in actor-turned-director Logan Marshall-Green’s behind-the-camera debut, “Adopt a Highway,” which hits theaters and VOD on November 1. Watch the first trailer below.

Here’s the synopsis from Rlje Films: “Russ Millings has just been released from prison after serving 21 years for a third strike conviction for possessing an ounce of marijuana. As he tries to adapt to a world he doesn’t recognize – including trying to learn how to use the internet – he finds an abandoned baby in a dumpster behind the fast food restaurant where he works as a dishwasher. Unsure of what to do, and caught between impulses of kindness and panic, Russ soon realizes this could be his chance at redemption.”

Adopt a Highway” is a Blumhouse production, and director Marshall-Green (best known for starring in films such as “Upgrade” and “The Invitation”) also writes.
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Jared Leto Pressured His Agents To Kill Todd Phillips’s ‘Joker’

If you could go back in time and witness any historical event, what would it be? This is a time-honored question among drunk friends everywhere. For some, the answer is religious; for others, historical. These days, I’m pretty sure my answer would be to throw this incredible gift right out the damn window and go back to the moment Jared Leto sat down to watch Todd Phillips‘s “Joker” for the first time.

Continue reading Jared Leto Pressured His Agents To Kill Todd Phillips’s ‘Joker’ at The Playlist.
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AMC Is Still In the Theater Business, But VOD Is a Funny Way of Showing It

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Was I the only one who found it weird when AMC Theatres announced that it was getting into the streaming business with the launch of AMC Theatres On Demand? When it comes to places to buy and rent movies, we’ve got Apple, Amazon, Fandango, Vudu, Google Play, YouTube, and a few more that I don’t need to remember because it’s too many already.

I also thought it suggested some seriously mixed messaging, but maybe that was just me… until I got a call from an NBC affiliate who wanted to do an interview about AMC’s new streaming service. That seemed like a curious topic for local news; why were they interested? The answer: They wanted to know if it meant AMC was getting out of the theater business.

Of course, AMC is very much dedicated to theatrical business, but this is a funny way of showing it.
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‘Zombeland: Double Tap’ Almost Had a ‘Ghostbusters’-Themed Apocalypse

When you take ten years to wrestle a script into place, a few ideas are going to fall by the wayside. This was the case with “Zombieland: Double Tap,” whose journey to the big screen involved plenty of rewrites, tweaks, and expired jokes. And as is often the case with long-gestating projects, sometimes it’s the ideas that didn’t come to fruition that are the most interesting.

Read More: Here’s How “Deadpool” Caused That 10-Year “Zombieland” Delay

Case in point: originally, screenwriters Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick had hoped to build on the success of Bill Murray‘s cameo in the original film by creating a “Ghostbusters“-themed apocalypse in the sequel.

Continue reading ‘Zombeland: Double Tap’ Almost Had a ‘Ghostbusters’-Themed Apocalypse at The Playlist.
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‘Joker’ Makes a Strange Connection Between Arthur Fleck and the Struggles of Black Women — Analysis

‘Joker’ Makes a Strange Connection Between Arthur Fleck and the Struggles of Black Women — Analysis
Todd Phillips has talked a lot about the controversies surrounding “Joker” — whether the movie condones or condemns its anti-hero, if it could actually inspire real-life violence — but has yet to address the movie’s complex racial connotations, especially when it comes to the way black women are portrayed in relation to Joaquin Phoenix’s Arthur Fleck.

In Hollywood, women still lag behind men in terms of on-screen visibility, and it’s significantly worse for women of color, as the most recent USC Annenberg diversity and inclusion study shows. Only 33.1% of roles in the 100 top movies of 2018 went to female characters; of those, just 11% went to underrepresented racial or ethnic groups, of which black women are included.

“Joker” at least deserves some credit on this front: It bucks that trend. Most women who interact with the white male lead happen to be black, and none are stereotypes or historically stock characters.
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Matt Reeves Recruits Michael Giacchino To Be ‘The Batman’ Composer

What’s the best way you’ve ever been notified of a new job? If your answer isn’t “onstage in front of hundreds of your admiring fans,” then clearly, you’ve picked the wrong career path. This can’t be said of Oscar-winning composer Michael Giacchino, whose role in the upcoming “The Batman” movie was announced during his recent Settling the Score event in London. Certainly makes that call from human resources seem a little less momentous, yeah?

Continue reading Matt Reeves Recruits Michael Giacchino To Be ‘The Batman’ Composer at The Playlist.
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‘Zombieland: Double Tap’ Post-Credits Scene Ups the Carnage and Hosts a Beloved Celebrity Cameo

‘Zombieland: Double Tap’ Post-Credits Scene Ups the Carnage and Hosts a Beloved Celebrity Cameo
[Editor’s note: The following post contains spoilers for “Zombieland: Double Tap.”]

Halfway through Ruben Fleischer’s long-awaited “Zombieland” sequel, “Zombieland: Double Tap,” the seemingly inevitable happens: someone mentions Bill Murray. It’s not a happy memory for anyone involved. In the original 2009 film, the beloved comedian played himself in an amusing cameo, welcoming the film’s core four into his Hollywood mansion after a long journey. Murray has survived the zombie plague by utilizing his acting talents for a fresh role: he pretends to be a zombie, all the better to keep the brain-gobblers confused. It’s a classic zombie movie trick, but one thrown into total disarray when Eisenberg’s notoriously jumpy Columbus is spooked by a costumed Murray, who amiably waddles into his swanky screening room to surprise Columbus and Breslin’s Little Rock.

Columbus shoots him dead, thus knocking off one more red-blooded human and a Hollywood legend to boot. It’s one of the best gags of the film,
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‘Looking For Alaska’ Review: The Throwback Teen Drama the Genre Needs

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‘Looking For Alaska’ Review: The Throwback Teen Drama the Genre Needs
Based on the 2005 John Green novel of the same name, “Looking For Alaska” was made to be adapted for television by Josh Schwartz. In fact, in 2005, it was set to be adapted by him as a feature film; but even after writing a screenplay that Green reportedly loved, the movie remained in development hell, with constant delays for years. Then in May 2018, it was announced that Schwartz would be writing the eight-episode limited series for Hulu, executive producing alongside his Fake Empire partner and longtime collaborator Stephanie Savage.

Now it’s finally here, and despite the story originally being written by someone else entirely, “Looking For Alaska” fits Schwarz and Savage like a glove. This is far from the duo’s first adaptation—“Gossip Girl,” “The Carrie Diaries,” and Marvel’s “Runaways” all exist—but it is impressive just how much the source material and the finished product makes it feel like their own creation.
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‘Bombshell’ and ‘Jojo Rabbit’ Share an Oscar Superpower: They’re Made For the Mainstream

‘Bombshell’ and ‘Jojo Rabbit’ Share an Oscar Superpower: They’re Made For the Mainstream
Fall film festivals play a huge role in launching the year’s best movies into Oscar contention, but here’s the dirty little secret: Films don’t need critics to play well for the Academy. The Tiff People’s Choice Award is so predictive with Academy Best Picture nominees because it represents a broad swatch of ardent cinephiles with mainstream taste. People’s Choice Award-winner “Green Book” in Toronto 2018 followed a long list of eventual Oscar winners, from “Slumdog Millionaire” and “12 Years a Slave” to “The King’s Speech.”

This year’s Tiff audience-winner was Taika Waititi’s “Jojo Rabbit,” a lighthearted but serious fable about a lonely young Nazi enthusiast (Roman Griffin Davis) and his imaginary friend Hitler (Waititi), who finds himself fighting for dominance with a young Jewish girl (Thomasin McKenzie) hidden by his activist mother (Scarlett Johansson). “Jojo Rabbit” may come at a resonant time as
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MoviePass, Dead for a Month, Sees Troubles Continue as Users Report Credit-Card Charges — Report

It turns out MovePass’ long downward spiral didn’t actually end when it shut down last month. Some former customers of the movie ticket subscription service are reporting they’re still getting charges from MoviePass on their credit cards, an accusation that the company’s CEO denies.

The New York Post Thursday cited several interviews and tweets from people who say they’ve seen charges from MoviePass after it was shut down September 14. Some reported charges were equal to that of the $9.95 membership fee, others were smaller amounts.

Among them was Chicago resident Maricar Tinio, who was quoted by the paper saying she was charged twice after September 14, once for $9.95 and another for $5.64.

MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe told the Post such reports were “false” and attributed them to former subscribers misreading their bank accounts. He said only one person was charged after the service was shut down.

“One single subscriber,
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Quentin Tarantino Refuses to Recut ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ for China Release

Quentin Tarantino Refuses to Recut ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ for China Release
Quentin Tarantino’s theatrical cut of “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” is the only cut he wants in theaters around the world. Variety has confirmed the director will not be recutting his ninth feature film in order to allow it to have a release in Chinese theaters. News broke earlier today China was blocking the October 25 theatrical release of “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” for unspecified reasons. China was set to be the last international market in which “Hollywood” would debut, and it could have pushed the movie’s worldwide box office haul close to or above the $400 million mark.

While China has not given a specific reason for pulling the “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” release, it has been widely speculated the movie was pulled either because of its graphic violence or because of a reported complaint filed by Bruce Lee’s daughter Shannon to China’s National Film Administration.
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‘The River and the Wall’ Reveals the Environmental Impact of a U.S.-Mexico Border Wall

‘The River and the Wall’ Reveals the Environmental Impact of a U.S.-Mexico Border Wall
The border wall is obviously a contentious political issue in the U.S. right now, but the documentary “The River and the Wall” examines the situation from a perspective some might not have considered just yet: the environmental one.

The film sees director Ben Masters and a small group of environmentalists and filmmakers travel 1200 miles down the Texas-Mexico border from El Paso to the Gulf of Mexico via bike, horse, and canoe. The filmmaker told the audience following a showing of the film at the International Documentary Association’s annual screening series in Los Angeles that he was inspired to make “The River and the Wall” while in the process of filming a documentary about mountain lions. When he realized the animals he’d tagged with Gps trackers were traveling freely between the U.S. and Mexico, he thought more about the impact a potential border wall would have.

“This
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